Wednesday, December 21, 2011

Historical eARC Review: Forever and A Day by Delilah Marvelle

FOREVER AND A DAY by Delilah Marvelle
FORMAT: eBook via Netgalley
GENRE: Historical
MASS MARKET PAPERBACK: 384 pages
PUBLISHER: HQN (December 20, 2011)
ISBN: 9780373776368

Roderick Gideon Tremayne, the recently appointed Duke of Wentworth, never expected to find himself in New York City, tracking down a mysterious map important to his late mother. And he certainly never expected to be injured, only to wake up with no memory of who he is. But when he sees the fiery-haired beauty who's taken it upon herself to rescue him, suddenly his memory is the last thing on his mind.

Georgia Milton, the young head of New York's notorious Forty Thieves, feels responsible for the man who was trying to save her bag from a thief. But she's not prepared for the fierce passion he ignites within her. When his memory begins to return, her whole world is threatened, and Roderick must choose between the life he forgot and the life he never knew existed.…

Where To Find Delilah: Author Site | Twitter | Facebook | Blog
Where To Buy: Amazon(pb) | Kindle | B&N/Nook | Book Depository | Powell's
Book Extras: Read an Excerpt
Go and Buy it NOW!
Other Book in Series(click for an excerpt):
novella available now
REVIEW & Series Trailer(contains spoilers, read at your own risk):

Oh sweet Jesu, where do I even begin with this review. So many thoughts are running through my head and what are or are not spoilers. I spent 5 hours starting in the dead of night reading this book and let me tell you, it was worth having an addled brain in the morning. Ah-mazingly Marvelleous. I thought my fan girl crush on Delilah Marvelle couldn't grow anymore but holy feck! It has. A lot. Reasons to read this book:
  1. Sassy, sassy, sassy: Georgia Milton has got quite the mouth on her. From the moment she meets The Brit, she's got quite the quip/repartee repertoire. He asks her for coffee, she tells him to get lost. He asks her again, she tells him she's not looking for a one night toss. Even when the poor Brit gets run over and loses his memory, she's still witty and quick.
  2. The Brit: Also known as Robinson Crusoe (after he loses his memory chasing down the ruffian who stole Georgia's reticule) and later known as Roderick Gideon Tremayne, a total Hottie McHottiepantsbreeches. He's ever so persistent when trying to get Georgia to have coffee with him. Poor sap, he'll never see what's coming.
  3. The Prince and the Pauper(ette): As Delilah (why yes, we're on a first name basis) dubbed her book. The Brit goes from being a well to do lord with all the luxuries money can buy to a man who pumps water for googly-eyed women, eating yams from a street vendor, falls in love with a woman below his station, dances awkwardly, believes he's Robinson Crusoe, remembers stories from books but doesn't remember his own name, who his family is and if he has a wife or not.
  4. My Fair Lady(ish): Okay, so no 'Enry 'Iggins 'ere. After find out who he really is, Roderick wants to marry Georgia (all or nothing) but wants her to be accepted by the snooty London ton. He tells her she must act a lady. Oh, basically loose who she really is and be someone else. But then realizes he must give her up and do what duty requires (duty can go hang for all I care). Enter the volumptuous Lady Burton. She teaches Georgia a thing or two about being a lady, especially how to talk; it's hanging not hangin'. [flashback: The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain]
  5. There's a mystery afoot. If you haven't read FOREVER MINE, you're missing out. Roderick's uncle was taken from his hotel room in New York City as a young child. He's been missing for a long time but Roderick is looking for him thanks to the pieces of the map his mother had hidden in books. That's the reason why he's in New York in the first place.
  6. Holy feck: Feck, feck, feck! Everyone in the book likes to use that word and you'll be using it instead. 
  7. Because Delilah Marvelle Wrote It! Is there any other reason? The woman has a way with getting the reader invested into the story, flipping page after page without wanting to put the book down. The emotions flow freely, the touches are sizzling off the pages and good lord almighty! dark and dangerous come out to play. 
FAVORITE QUOTES(what? I couldn't pick just one):
"He tightened his jaw and glanced toward the young woman sitting beside him on the bench. Georgia. Like the state. Who the hell named their daughter after a state? It would be like naming one's daughter Paris. It be-spoke of too much grandeur with very little to show."
"Unlike you, sir, I'm lookin' to marry. Not dance. A woman of little means, such as myself, need a dependable relationship that will forever and a day. Not your version of a day and a night." (***quotes subject to change in finished copy***)
OVERALL: Seriously, Delilah Marvelle's got a hit on her hands. In typical Delilah fashion, she's got me laughing, sighing, crying, gasping, shouting (very quietly since I finished this in the early morning: 5 hours of nonstop reading and spastic tweeting) at the heroine to shut up and give the hero a chance already and wanting more, so much more after finishing. My love for Delilah Marvelle's stories have grown a zillion-fold *sigh* 1 part The Prince and the Pauper(ette) plus 1 part My Fair Lady(ish) equals Me, Lost in Marvelle for 5 hours.


 ***review copy from Netgalley***



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